Aquarium Tropical Fish Pictures and Names

German Blue Ram

The German blue ram is a colourful and fairly peaceful dwarf cichlid. It is a popular aquarium fish, but is not recommended for beginners.

The scientific name of the German blue ram is Mikrogeophagus ramirezi. It belongs to the subfamily Geophaginae in the cichlid family. The fish is named after Manuel Ramirez, one of the first collectors and importers of German blue ram for the aquarium trade. The species was scientifically described in 1948 by George S. Myers and R. R. Harry, who considered it a part of the genus Apistogramma.

If you read about the German blue ram in older sources, you might find older scientific names such as Apistogramma ramirezi, Microgeophagus ramirezi, Papiliochromis ramirezi, Pseudoapistogramma ramirezi and Pseudogeophagus ramirezi. As you can see, the German blue ram has been moved a lot between various genera.

The German blue ram has been given many different common names in English, many of them alluding to the beautiful coloration of this species or to a specific strain. It is for instance known as Blue Ram, Golden Ram, Butterfly cichlid and Dwarf butterfly cichlid. The names Ramirez's dwarf cichlid, Ramirezi, Ram cichlid and Ram are also used.

In Asia, several strains of Mikrogeophagus ramirezi have been developed for the aquarium trade. Aquarists can for instance purchase unusually yellow rams, known as Golden rams or xanthistic rams. Xanthochromism (also called xanthochroism or xanthism) causes animals to be usually yellow due to an excess of yellow pigment, or possibly due to a loss of darker pigments that allows yellow pigment to dominate the colouration. Asian ram breeders have also developed rams with large, high-bodies and elongated fins. It should be noted that Golden rams and rams with unusually bodies tend to be more sensitive than the normal wild-type German blue ram. Low fertility and poor brood care are also fairly common.


Most freshwater fish sold for aquaria are

by ibbica

*tropical* freshwater fish, so yes they need a heater to be happy.
Minnows are coldwater fish, mollies and dojo loaches are somewhat flexible in their temperature requirments, and neon tetras are tropical fish. Not really a tank I'd set up myself, as it's impossible to maintain the 'ideal' conditions for each species.
I'd suggest looking up the optimum conditions for each of your species, and probably split them into at least 2 separate tanks. Note that 'optimum' isn't the same as 'survivable'.

If nitrates are high, yes live

by ibbica

Plants should help. They don't work instantaneously, though...
Goldfish are very different from other freshwater fish, they need colder water (higher O2 content) and are FILTHY creatures (need lots of plants or other filtration).
pH going crazy stinks. Did you check your source (tap? well? rain?) water at all?
Brand new gravel may cause problems, if the beneficial (ammonia-eating and/or nitrite-eating) bacteria were living on the 'old' substrate.
What sort of filtration system do you use? Mechanical (sponge) or chemical (charcoal or other)?
Most plecos are tropical species, whereas goldfish are coldwater species. Temperature inconsistencies could cause problems as well.

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